Heritage Alliance of the New Silk Road
WELCOME to
Virtual Plenary Session
of HANSR 2020
Prior to the workshop, we invite you to participate in the virtual opening ceremony we have prepared for you, which includes 3 short videos

Gultas Kurmanbay
the Director of Nazarbayev University's Rukhani Zhangyru Cultural Center, shares brief words of welcome in Kazakh (with English Subtitles)

Claudia Chang
Professor of Anthropology Emerita at Sweet Briar College, and author of Rethinking Prehistoric Central Asia: Shepherds, Farmers, and Nomads (2017), presents the workshop's Keynote Speech, "The Why of Cultural Heritage: The DNA of Heritage in the Midst of Global Crisis"

Nazarbayev University Orchestra
performs "Kozimnin Qarasy," which can be viewed along with other projects on the
NU Orchestra YouTube Channel
About HANSR
Welcome to HANSR:
The Heritage Alliance of the New Silk Road
A small number of scholars from Liverpool University, Nazarbayev University in Kazakhstan, State University of New York Buffalo, Xi'an Jiao Tong University and Polytechnic University of Hong Kong, launched HANSR at Liverpool University in September 2018.

HANSR is the Heritage Alliance of the New Silk Road, designed to investigate the creative potential for social, historical, archaeological and economic research opportunities in preserving cultural heritage. It also explores sustainable and ethical economic research opportunities through a series of Roundtables, conferences, publications, scholarly debates and discussions. All aspects of tangible and intangible heritage of the new Silk Road are of interest to HANSR members.
HANSR is an informal sub-forum of the University Alliance of the Silk Road (UASR). UASR was established in 2015, with leadership from Xi'an Jiao Tong University, to develop educational and research collaboration and economic growth in nations associated with the Silk Road. UASR incorporates themes of: cultural exchange, capacity building, educational exchange, and digital infrastructure for knowledge exchange within member universities. This is consistent with the fifth thematic area of the Belt and Road

Initiative: "people to people exchange" and human capital development (Kohli, Linn and Zucker, 2019).

University of Liverpool HANSR founding members, Hawken, Foxhall, Birch and Endfield noted in 2018 that, in forming HANSR: "We aim to … collaboratively foster cultural exchange, community engagement and wellbeing through generating increased awareness of the regions' heritage, and to share knowledge and good practice".

We warmly welcome you to explore these resources and participate in the events and discussions which are of interest to you and to your research colleagues and students.

Please consider participating in the first virtual HANSR Round Table, hosted by us here at Nazarbayev University, in November 2020. Details are available on this website.
HANSR Timeline
    1
    First HANSR Round Table
    hosted by University of Liverpool, in September 2018, included resilience and heritage, preserving and promoting heritage, using 2 experts and amateurs in the co-creation of heritage initiatives with communities, expanding the use of digital technologies and linking physical space with tangible and intangible heritage.
    2
    Second HANSR Round Table
    hosted by Xi'an Jiaotong University in September 2019, included interdisciplinary work across humanities, physics, biology and social sciences. Buildings, natural landscapes, language, religion and rituals, traditional culture and institutions, visual images, digital heritage, music and auditory.
    3
    Third HANSR Round Table
    hosted by Nazarbayev University is the first HANSR event in a completely virtual format, will be held in November 2020. The theme is Heritage at Risk: Connecting the Tangible and the Intangible. It will explore the dangers facing heritage resources in the Silk Road Region, best practices for mitigating those dangers and opportunities to leverage heritage assets for sustainable development.
    HANSR events
    provide opportunities for networking among scholars, students and professionals with a common interest in preserving the unique Silk Road Region heritage.
    We hope to see you
    virtually or in person at our Round Tables and events, either here in Kazakhstan or hosted by other member universities.
    Dan Pugh
    Dean, School of Sciences and Humanities, Nazarbayev University
    Loretta O'Donnell
    Vice Provost for Academic Affairs, Nazarbayev University
    References
    Hawken, Foxhall, Birch, Endfield, (2018) Heritage Alliance of the New Silk Road (HANSIR): A New Partnership for Knowledge Exchange. Unpublished explanatory note
    Harinder S. Kohli, Johannes F. Linn, and Leo M. Zucker, (2019) China's Belt and Road Initiative: Potential Transformation of Central Asia and the South Caucasus, Sage
    3rd HANSR Workshop
    Heritage at Risk: Connecting the Tangible and Intangible
    About our 3rd workshop
    You are warmly invited to the third workshop of the Heritage Alliance of the New Silk Road (HANSR), 16-20 November 2020, hosted online by Nazarbayev University.

    This workshop, Heritage at Risk: Connecting the Tangible and the Intangible, will explore the dangers facing heritage resources in the Silk Road Region, best practices for mitigating those dangers, and opportunities to leverage heritage assets for sustainable development. Building on previous HANSR events, this will also be an opportunity to develop a network of scholars, professionals, and students with a common interest in preserving the unique cultural resources of the Silk Road Region.

    The rapid economic development of Central Asia is bringing global interest and presenting new possibilities for scholarly collaboration and heritage tourism, but it also presents great risks. Cultural resources are faced with destruction in the wake of infrastructure development and increasing value in the antiquities market. Meanwhile, the accompanying forces of globalization will mean accelerated changes to traditional lifeways including in the most rural areas.

    This event will examine the current state of heritage scholarship in the region and global experiences in mitigating the impact of development. Forward looking discussions will consider possible approaches to minimizing the negative impacts, maximizing opportunities for scholarly collaboration, and carving out new niches for sustainably managing a heritage economy.

    Speakers will be invited from leading scholars of the region, international leaders in heritage management, and local practitioners. A special event will be held to engage student voices and give them the opportunity to discuss their work with leading scholars. Participants from around the world will be invited to observe and to take part in live question and answer sessions.

    The workshop will be conducted through the Zoom platform with daily sessions of three hours each, starting from 17:00 Nur-Sultan time (GMT +6) following the schedule below.
    1
    November 16
    Creating Connections: Current Heritage Scholarship in the Silk Road Region
    2
    November 17
    Protecting Resources at Risk: Global Practices in Heritage Management
    3
    November 18
    Looking Ahead: The Future of Heritage Management in the Silk Road Region
    4
    November 19
    Student Presentation and Competition

    Program
    Day 1
    Day 2
    Day 3
    Day 4
    Monday, November 16
    17:00 - 20:00 Nur-Sultan time (GMT +6)

    Creating Connections: Current Heritage Scholarship in the Silk Road Region

    Moderator:

    Uli Schamiloglu, Professor, Director, Ph.D. Program in Eurasian Studies, Nazarbayev University,
    uli.schamiloglu@nu.edu.kz
    17:00 – 17:15
    17:00 – 17:15
    Official Welcome
    • Ilesanmi Adesida, Provost, Nazarbayev University
    • Representatives, UASR Leadership
    17:15 – 17:30
    17:15 – 17:30
    Peter Hommel
    Lecturer in Archaeomaterials, University of Liverpool, Peter.Hommel@liverpool.ac.uk
    Paper 1: "Hearth and Home: Promoting the Identification, Investigation and Protection of Prehistoric Settlement Landscapes in Southern Siberia"
    17:30 – 17:45
    17:30 – 17:45
    Gavin Slade
    Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, gavin.slade@nu.edu.kz
    Paper 2: "In the Gulag's Shadow: Places and Practices of Remembering and Forgetting Penal Trauma in Kazakhstan"
    17:45 – 18:00
    17:45 – 18:00
    Guillaume Tiberghien
    Lecturer in Tourism Management/Marketing, University of Glasgow, Guillaume.Tiberghien@glasgow.ac.uk
    Paper 3: "Kazakhstani Heritage and Politics of Authenticity in Tourism: Opportunities and Challenges"
    18:00 – 18:30
    18:00 – 18:30
    Q & A Session for Papers 1-3
    18:30 – 18:45
    18:30 – 18:45
    Break
    18:45 – 19:00
    18:45 – 19:00
    Paula Dupuy
    Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University, paula.dupuy@nu.edu.kz
    Paper 4: "Trans-Eurasian Exchanges: A Look from Inside Kazakhstan"
    19:00 – 19:15
    19:00 – 19:15
    Lina Liu
    Associate Professor, Law School, Xi'an Jiaotong University, liulina@mail.xjtu.edu.cn
    Paper 5: "The Harmonization of Urban Development and Protection of Cultural Heritage from the Perspective of China"
    19:15 – 19:30
    19:15 – 19:30
    Nikolai Tsyrempilov
    Associate Professor, Director of M.A. Program in Eurasian Studies, Nazarbayev University, nikolay.tsyrempilov@nu.edu.kz
    Paper 6: "Visualizing Sacred Geography of Kazakhstan: Overview of an Interdisciplinary Project Based at NU"
    19:30 – 20:00
    19:30 – 20:00
    Q & A Session for Papers 4-6
    Tuesday, November 17
    17:00 - 20:00 Nur-Sultan time (GMT +6)

    Protecting Resources at Risk: Global Practices in Heritage Management

    Moderator:

    Eva-Marie Dubuisson, Assistant Professor, Nazarbayev University,
    eva.dubuisson@nu.edu.kz
    17:00 – 17:15
    17:00 – 17:15
    Aybar Kassenalin
    Archaeologist, Cofounder, Association of Archaeologists, aibar.kassenalin@gmail.com
    Paper 1: "Creating a Website Dedicated to Archaeology in Kazakhstan: https://archaeology.kz (in Russian)
    17:15 – 17:30
    17:15 – 17:30
    Natalya Voyakina
    Lawyer, National World Heritage Committee, Archaeological Expertise Scientific Research Organization, nvoyakina@inbox.ru
    Paper 2: "Heritage Management in Kazakhstan – Ratification and Implementation of the Convention, 1972" (in Russian)
    17:30 – 17:45
    17:30 – 17:45
    Valeriy Tolmachev
    Deputy-Director for Science and External Relations, International Centre for the Rapprochement of Cultures (Almaty), International Network of the Silk Roads UNESCO Programme, v.tolma@gmail.com
    Paper 3: "Current Problems of the Enhancement of the Heritage of the Great Silk Road in
    Kazakhstan and the UNESCO Silk Roads Programme"
    17:45 – 18:15
    17:45 – 18:15
    Q & A Session for Papers 1-3
    18:15 – 18:30
    18:15 – 18:30
    Break
    18:30 – 19:00
    18:30 – 19:00
    Binqing Zhai
    Professor, Head, Department of Architecture and Director, Institute of Architecture, Xi 'an Jiaotong University, bqzhai@xjtu.edu.cn

    Paper 4: "Conservation of Han Chang'an Capital Heritage Site and the Impact to Local Indigenous Lives"
    18:45 – 19:00
    18:45 – 19:00
    Andrey Filchenko
    Professor, Nazarbayev University, andrey.filchenko@nu.edu.kz
    Paper 5: "Contemporary Practices of Language Documentation as Cultural Heritage Preservation"
    19:00 – 19:15
    19:00 – 19:15
    Gil Stein
    Director, Chicago Center for Cultural Heritage Preservation and Professor of Archaeology, Oriental Institute, University of Chicago, gstein@uchicago.edu
    Paper 6: "Preserving Cultural Heritage Along the Silk Road: University of Chicago Projects in Central Asia and Afghanistan"
    19:15 – 19:30
    19:15 – 19:30
    Jeffrey Altschul
    Founder, Statistical Research, Inc. and Co-President, Coalition for Archaeological Synthesis, jhaltschul@canelogroup.net
    Paper 7: "Building a Future without losing the Past: The Challenge of Cultural Heritage Management"
    19:30 – 20:00
    19:30 – 20:00
    Q & A Session for Papers 4-7
    Wednesday, November 18
    17:00 - 19:00 Nur-Sultan time (GMT +6)

    Looking Ahead: The Future of Heritage Management in the Silk Road Region

    Moderator:

    Daniel Pugh, Dean, School of Sciences and Humanities, Nazarbayev University,
    dpugh@nu.edu.kz
    17:00 – 17:50
    17:00 – 17:50
    Brief Presentations by Panelists
    Panelists:
    Neil Collins
    Professor, Nazarbayev University, neil.collins@nu.edu.kz
    Aziz Burkhanov
    Aziz Burkhanov, Associate Professor, Graduate School of Public Policy, Nazarbayev University, aziz.burkhanov@nu.edu.kz
    Soumyen Bandyopadhyay
    Sir James Stirling Chair in Architecture, Liverpool School of Architecture, Soumyen.Bandyopadhyay@liverpool.ac.uk
    Dimitriy Voyakin
    Director, International Institute for Central Asian Studies, Samarkand, Uzbekistan; International Facilitator, UNESCO Silk Road Serial Transnational Nomination, d_voyakin@hotmail.com
    Peter Biehl
    Professor of Anthropology, American Council on Education (ACE) Fellow, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, pbiehl@buffalo.edu
    Reed Coil
    Assistant Professor, Nazarbayev University, reed.coil@nu.edu.kz
    Loretta O'Donnell
    Vice Provost, Academic Affairs, Nazarbayev University, loretta.odonnell@nu.edu.kz
    Gani Nygmetov
    Deputy Akim, North Kazakhstan Region, gnygymetov@gmail.com
    17:50 – 18:30
    17:50 – 18:30
    Discussion among Panelists
    18:30 – 19:00
    18:30 – 19:00
    Questions from Audience
    Thursday, November 19
    Discussants17:00 - 19:00 Nur-Sultan time (GMT +6)

    Discussion of Student Video Presentations, Awards, Closing Remarks

    Moderator:

    Lin Foxhall, Rathbone Chair of Ancient History and Classical Archaeology, University of Liverpool,
    Lin.Foxhall@liverpool.ac.uk

    Discussants:
    Michael Frachetti, Professor, Department of Anthropology, Washington University in St. Louis,
    frachetti@wustl.edu

    Gil Stein, Director, Chicago Center for Cultural Heritage Preservation and Professor of Archaeology, Oriental Institute, University of Chicago, gstein@uchicago.edu
    17:00 – 17:30
    17:00 – 17:30
    Brief Presentations by Moderator and Discussants
    Michael Frachetti
    Professor in the Department of Anthropology, Washington University
    Michael Frachetti is a Professor in the Department of Anthropology, Washington University in St. Louis. His research focuses on the emergence and growth of Asia's ancient Silk Road and the role of nomadic pastoralists in shaping ancient and modern civilization. For close to 20 years, he has led archaeological expeditions across Central Asia, aided by high-tech archaeological methods and data analysis, using high-rez sattelite imagery, 3D modelling, and computer simulations to help predict, discover, and document the archaeology of the Silk Road from the Bronze Age to the Medieval era.
    17:30 – 18:00
    17:30 – 18:00
    Responses from Student Panelists
    Student Panelists:

    National University of Sciences & Technology, ISLAMABAD, PAKISTAN
    • Saba Fatima, student of GeoInformatics Engineering (GIS & Remote Sensing), "UN Sustainable Development Goals and Silk Road Initiatives"
    • Khizer Abbas, student of GeoInformatics Engineering (GIS & Remote Sensing), "Silk Road and CPEC Opportunities and Threats"

    Nazarbayev University, NUR-SULTAN, KAZAKHSTAN

    • Adlet Dairbayev, MA student in Eurasian Studies, "Commodification of Heritage in Bayanaul" Xi'an Jiaotong University, XI'AN, CHINA
    • Yingkui SUN, student of Cultural Heritage Conservation and Sustainable Development of Rural Areas, "Landscape Evolution and Mechanism Research of the Adaptive Cycle in Xinjiang Rural Areas of China"

    Bauman Moscow State Technical University, MOSCOW, RUSSIA

    • Darya Gildunina and Julia Drozdova, Masters students in Metrology and Interchangeability, "The Industrial Revolution: Mathematical instruments at the Canvases of the English School Artists"

    Benha University, BANHA, EGYPT

    • Samar Mohamed Mongi and Mostafa Ayman Mostafa, Students in the Chinese Department, "From Silk Industry to Making History"

    18:00 – 18:30
    18:00 – 18:30
    Questions from Audience
    18:30 – 18:35
    18:30 – 18:35
    Awards for Student Presentations
    18:35 – 19:00
    18:35 – 19:00
    Closing Remarks


    Meet our Panelists
    Peter Hommel
    Lecturer in Archaeomaterials, University of Liverpool
    Peter Hommel is a Lecturer in Archaeomaterials at the University of Liverpool. He has been working on Siberian archaeology since 2006. Between 2011–2020, Dr. Hommel was employed at the University of Oxford, working on projects involving ceramics and metals, Iron Age art, 'nomadic' settlement landscapes and human-animal relationships.

    Paper: "Hearth and Home: Promoting the Identification, Investigation and Protection of Prehistoric Settlement Landscapes in Southern Siberia"

    Abstract: Over the last decade, field research in the Altai Mountains and Kazakhstan has shifted the focus of research away from ostentatious burials and onto the evidence from settlements, revealing new details of the organisation of socio-economic life in the Bronze and Early Iron Ages. In 2018, as part of this rising wave of interest in local pastoralist landscapes, we began a pilot programme of survey, using remote sensing techniques, field survey and targeted excavation to identify a series of prehistoric settlements in the Saksar Mountains of Khakassia and along the floodplain of the Yenisei. This British Academy funded project, the results of which will be outlined in this presentation, not only reiterated the rich potential of settlements, to open windows onto the pattern of everyday life in Early Iron Age communities, but also revealed some potential threats to the integrity of these largely undocumented sites.
    Gavin Slade
    Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University
    Gavin Slade is an Associate Professor of Sociology at Nazarbayev University. He completed a PhD in criminology from the University of Oxford and has previously held positions at the University of Toronto, Freie Universitat, Berlin and the University of Glasgow. He works on questions of criminal justice reform in the former Soviet Union with a focus on prisons, policing and organized crime. His most recently completed project, funded by the German Research Foundation and the European Commission, involved a comparative case study of how penal reform produces violence and contention in post-Soviet prison systems, comparing Georgia, Moldova, Lithuania and Kyrgyzstan. Slade is a Principal Investigator on a new project running from 2018-2021, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council in the UK, and entitled 'In the Gulag's Shadow: Producing, Consuming and Perceiving Prisons in the Former Soviet Union.' The project applies criminological theory to show how the practice of incarceration is being reconstituted by social, economic, cultural and political processes in Russia and Kazakhstan. Slade has also done work for the Council of Europe, Open Society Foundation as well as the European Union's project 'Enhancing Criminal Justice in Kazakhstan.'

    Paper: "In the Gulag's Shadow: Places and Practices of Remembering and Forgetting Penal Trauma in Kazakhstan"

    Abstract: This talk will give an overview of the In the Gulag's Shadow project, a cross-national study of local perceptions of prisons and prisoners in Gulag and non-Gulag sites across Kazakhstan and Russia. Case studies in the project include prison museums, often carefully managed on the national level, and other sites, including working prisons, where punishment today remains an economic resource as well as both an object of remembrance and cultural and historical consumption. Preliminary findings suggest that while prison museum sites often conceal present day continuities with the past, communities in working prison sites wish to highlight those continuities and to preserve the place of prison in the local economy.
    Guillaume Tiberghien
    Lecturer in Tourism Management/Marketing, University of Glasgow
    Dr Guillaume Tiberghien completed a PhD degree in Tourism from Auckland University of Technology and holds a Master degree in International Relations from University Paris-Est Marne la Vallée and a Bachelor in Business Administration from Kedge Business School in France. He has over 15 years of experience in researching Tourism-related subjects and teaching Bachelor and Master Degree Programmes in Tourism Management and Marketing in an international context.

    Guillaume is the programme leader in Dumfries of the triple accreditated Master degree in 'Management and Sustainable Tourism' with the Adam Smith Business School. He was an associate programme leader for the launch and development of an undergraduate Tourism and Hospitality programme at KIMEP University in Kazakhstan between 2008-2012.

    His main teaching and research activities focus on the relationships between Cultural Heritage Tourism, Sustainable Tourism Development and Tourism Marketing. Guillaume also conducted and participated in several consulting projects in the fields of Tourism Marketing and Management in Central Asia, New Zealand and the UK.
    Paper: "Kazakhstani Heritage and Politics of Authenticity in Tourism: Opportunities and Challenges"

    Abstract: Although the number of inbound tourists remains relatively small, Kazakhstan possesses numerous tourism heritage sites based on its past Soviet times, nomadic culture and a variety of unique cultural landscapes. Whereas the tourism industry tends to provide its own definitions of the 'authentic', traditional or typical, it is therefore important to understand how Kazakhstani heritage tourism attractions and destinations are constructed and marketed by the private and public sectors; particularly how the tourism industry in Kazakhstan defines and presents its version of the genuinely local in both cultural and sustainable aspects of tourism experience.

    The various ways the Kazakhstani Government wishes to frame heritage for tourism purposes raise important questions for the future development of tourism in the country. For example, what aspects of the remnants of the former nomadic culture can be commercialised and adapted for tourism? How is the Soviet Gulag heritage being commodified and interpreted for tourism in museums? What are the opportunities and challenges for developing heritage tourism from a multi-stakeholder perspective?
    This presentation will offer some directions in which to comprehend the role authenticity plays in the tourism practices of heritage sites. It will first delve into the case of the commercialisation of nomadic culture for eco-cultural tourism development. Questions of ownership of historical narratives, conservation, economic and educational priorities will then be discussed in the context of Gulag heritage as portrayed and interpreted in museums for local and international visitation.
    Paula Dupuy
    Associate Professor, Nazarbayev University
    Paula N. Doumani Dupuy is an Assistant Professor at Nazarbayev University in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology. She received her PhD in Anthropology from Washington University in St. Louis (United States of America). Since 2009, she has led archaeological projects in central Eurasia as a material specialist, and field archaeologist. Her research interests include the materiality of pastoralism, community-based interactions and mobility underlying craft production, and the transfer of technologies/materials during the Bronze Age. These topics underpin the research goals of excavations she is currently leading at Prehistoric multi-complex archaeological sites in eastern Kazakhstan's steppe and mountain regions. She is Director of the Trans-Eurasian Exchanges: Contemporary Dialogues and Archaeological Inquiry Project (TEECA) and Co-director of the Dzhungar Mountains Archaeology Project (DMAP) in collaboration with the Institute of Archaeology in Almaty, Kazakhstan.

    Paper: "Trans-Eurasian Exchanges: A Look from Inside Kazakhstan"

    Abstract: Eastern Kazakhstan has long sat at the intersection of two distinct trans-regional interaction spheres: the Eurasian Steppe and the Inner Asian Mountain Corridor. Despite their importance during the Bronze Age, the relationship between these two distinct social-geographic realms has not been extensively studied. Toward this end, two international research teams led by the author are involved in archaeological excavations in steppe and mountain sites in east Kazakhstan. Material recovered shows a range of "exotic" materials were implicated in diverse systems of social power and conformity across Kazakhstan's key highways that linked Asia and Europe from 5000 years ago. The work emerges at a crucial moment as archaeology has become a renewed focus of attention in the context of the Belt and Road Initiative, which will have a marked impact on the preservation and portrayal of archaeological heritage.
    Lina Liu
    Associate Professor, Law School, Xi'an Jiaotong University
    Lina Liu is an Associate Professor at Xi 'an Jiaotong University. Her research interests include cultural heritage law, international law, and intellectual property law. She has hosted over 8 funded projects concerning cultural heritage and intellectual property. Three of her research reports were adopted by the Chinese Administration of Cultural Relics; two of her English-language articles were reprinted by UNESCO. Her monograph, Legal Protection of China's Underwater Cultural Heritage was awarded the "top 10 books of national cultural heritage in 2015". She has participated in more than 20 international academic conferences on cultural industries in the United States, France, Singapore, Japan, Russia, etc. She is currently a Council Member of China's Science and Technology Law Society, Deputy Secretary-General of Science and Technology Law Association in Shaanxi Provincial Law Society, and Secretary-General of Intellectual Property Research Association in Xi ' An Law Society.

    Paper: The Harmonization of Urban Development and Protection of Cultural Heritage from the Perspective of China

    Abstract: When cultural heritage is seen as the proof of human civilization, the cultural heritage on the Silk Road is the identification of the communication of the East and West civilizations. Several paths across Europe and Asia, and goods and cultural exchanges along Silk Road from Xi'an (Chang'an), China to Europeans. This presentation takes Chinese cultural heritage as the object of study and consider the harmonization of urban development and protection of cultural heritage.

    The lecture firstly lays out how China protects its different kinds of cultural heritage, such as temples, historical blocks or city, or industrial heritage with the development of urbanization. Secondly, it will discuss the effective protection and utilization of the movable cultural relics which are in the museum, by analyzing three significant museums and utilization of the Chinese Forbidden City, the Metropolitan Museum of America and National Museum of Kazakhstan. Lastly, the lecture tries to analyze the barrier effect of law on the Protection of cultural heritage from the angle of law, and how to better protect the cultural heritage which symbolizes human material and spiritual civilization.
    Nikolai Tsyrempilov
    Associate Professor, Director of M.A. Program in Eurasian Studies, Nazarbayev University
    Nikolay Tsyrempilov is an Associate Professor at the School of Humanities and Social Sciences. His research is mainly focused on the history of Buddhist communities in Russia, Mongolia and Tibet. He is especially concerned with the issues of how Tibetan Buddhist religious institutes formed up and the ways the states influenced this process. In addition, Nikolay is an explorer of Mongolian and Tibetan written heritage having compiled a series of catalogs and published a few samples. From recent time his research interests include the history of the Oirats and the Dzunghar Khanate, sacred geography of Kazakhstan. He is the PI of the interdisciplinary project aimed at creation of the electronic atlas of Kazakhstan's sacred sites.

    Paper: "Visualizing Sacred Geography of Kazakhstan: Overview of an Interdisciplinary
    Project Based at NU"

    Abstract: In 2016 the then President of Kazakhstan Nursultan Nazarbayev initiated the governmental program of exploration and codification of sacred sites of Kazakhstan. This gave impetus to a number of research projects aimed at compilation of registers and maps of religious and sacred sites across the country. In 2018, a team of NU religionists launched the research project the main outcome of which is the electronic map of Kazakhstan's sacred sites. Using various reference books and catalogs, the team created the most complete map of Kazakhstan's sacred sites (1,500 sites). The map accurately demonstrates the diversity of Kazakhstan's religious landscape, both contemporary and historical and allows volunteers to contribute to the atlas by providing information about the site in their locality. The presentation will show the stages of the project and demonstrate the functionality of the atlas.
    Aybar Kassenalin
    Archaeologist, Cofounder, Association of Archaeologists
    Касеналин Айбар Ерланович, Археолог, Окончил Казахский национальный университет имени аль-Фараби в 2014 г. (PhD). Специалист по изучению памятников истории и археологии Центрального Казахстана эпохи бронзы, раннего железного века и средневековья. Принимает участие в полевых исследованиях с 2005 года. Проводил исследования в таких памятниках, как: могильник Бегазы, Сарыколь, Бегазы-3Б, Кызылшилик, Болган ана и др., а также на поселениях Каратал-2, Тагыбайбулак, Едирей и др. Помимо археологических исследований проводит работы по консервации и реставрации объектов историко-культурного наследия.

    В разные года работал в Институте археологии имени А.Х. Маргулана, Национальном музее РК, преподавал в Казахском национальном университете имени аль-Фараби, Евразийском национальном университете имени Л.Н. Гумилева.
    Автор и соавтор монографии, Сводов памятников истории и культуры Акмолинской области, методического пособия по историко-культурному наследию, свыше 20 научных статей, опубликованных в республиканских и международных изданиях.
    А.Е. Касеналин является автором первого казахстанского телевизионного реалити-шоу программы для детей «Жұмбақ жер» республиканского телеканала Balapan, с целью популяризации археологического наследия Казахстана среди подрастающего поколения.

    В настоящее время кроме научной деятельности занимается созданием веб-платформы по археологии Казахстана «ARCHAEOLOGY.KZ», который предназначен для систематизации всех имеющихся данных (объекты, литература, экспедиции, энциклопедия и т.д.) по археологии Казахстана, в том числе по созданию единой базы данных памятников истории и культуры с интерактивным доступом.

    Paper: "Creating a Website Dedicated to Archaeology in Kazakhstan:
    https://archaeology.kz (in Russian)
    Natalya Voyakina
    Lawyer, National World Heritage Committee, Archaeological Expertise Scientific Research Organization
    Наталья Воякина: специалист по гражданскому праву (Казахский государственный юридический университет), экономист (Московская академия труда и социальных отношений). Научный сотрудник, юрист-консультант по вопросам изучения и сохранения объектов историко-культурного наследия отдела документации и археологической консервации Института археологии им. А.Х. Маргулана МОН РК (с 2002). Национальный эксперт Республики Казахстан в Исполнительный комитет по Всемирному Наследию стран СНГ (2010-2011). Автор проекта Закона РК «Об археологическом наследии». Разработчик положения «Об охране и использовании объектов всемирного наследия РК». Член рабочей парламентской группы по обсуждению проектов законов Республики Казахстан «Об охране и использовании объектов историко-культурного наследия» и «О внесении изменений и дополнений в некоторые законодательные акты Республики Казахстан по вопросам историко-культурного наследия». Участник различных археологических экспедиций. Автор научных статей по правовым механизмам сохранения историко-культурных объектов и формам защиты национальных интересов на международной арене в сфере культурного наследия.

    Paper: "Heritage Management in Kazakhstan – Ratification and Implementation of the Convention, 1972" (in Russian)

    Abstract: В 1972 году на Генеральной конференции ЮНЕСКО была принята Конвенция о защите всемирного культурного и природного наследия, которая вступила в силу в декабре 1975 года. В 1994 г. Казахстан стал стороной Конвенции и взял на себя обязательства по исполнению её положений. Эти обязательства затрагивают не только внешнеполитические отношения Республики Казахстан с субъектами международного права (государствами, международными организациями), но и внутренние государственные процессы в сфере охраны, использования объектов культурного и природного наследия.

    С момента ратификации Конвенции Республикой Казахстан велась активная работа на международном уровне. Казахстан в течение четырёх лет принимал участие в работе Комитета всемирного наследия, работая над подготовкой и продвижением номинаций от Республики, а также участвуя в работе экспертных групп по оценке и охране объектов всемирного наследия. Сегодня в список Всемирного наследия ЮНЕСКО включены 5 Казахстанских объектов, среди которых Чанъань-Тянь-Шанский коридор Великого Шёлкового пути, вошедший в Список в 2014 г., насчитывающий 8 казахстанских памятников.

    Выполнение международных обязательств - одна из важнейших задач государства на международной арене, успешное выполнение которой напрямую зависит от своевременного создания в государстве внутренних правовых механизмов для реализации международных правовых норм. Такой процесс называется имплементацией (от англ. Implementation — осуществлять). Большой юридический словарь даёт следующее определение имплементации: «фактическое осуществление международных обязательств на внутригосударственном уровне путем трансформации международно-правовых норм в национальные законы и подзаконные акты» (c. 199). Различные способы имплементации международных норм можно увидеть на примере Закона РК «Об охране и использовании объектов историко-культурного наследия» от 26 декабря 2019 года.
    Valeriy Tolmachev
    Deputy-Director for Science and External Relations, International Centre for the Rapprochement of Cultures (Almaty), International Network of the Silk Roads UNESCO Program
    Valeriy Tolmachev, born in 1963, has a degree in journalism from Lomonosov Moscow State University (Russia) and is an ENA (France) graduate with a public administration diploma ("Marc Bloch" promotion). From 2002 to 2011 he was in charge of cultural, scientific, education and communication issues at the Permanent Mission of Kazakhstan to UNESCO. From 2014 to 2019 – Vice-president at the non-profit «Culture» Foundation (Kazakhstan).

    He is currently the Deputy Director for Sciences and External Relations at the International Centre for the Rapprochement of Cultures in Almaty, under the auspices of UNESCO.

    Paper: "Current problems of the enhancement of the heritage of the Great Silk Road in Kazakhstan and the UNESCO Silk Roads Program"

    Abstract: The Great Silk Road was the bloodstream of trade and cultural exchanges, which we regard as an allegory for the rapprochement of cultures. The Silk Roads are an excellent example of tolerant relationships between the world's religions and cultures. And we have to use it in order to enhance, particularly within the framework of the International Decade for the Rapprochement of Cultures (2013-2022), an intercultural dialogue and religious tolerance, as well as educate younger generations on the shared history and heritage of the Silk Roads.

    In line with the policy of promoting intercultural dialogue, UNESCO has developed the Silk Roads Program and is carrying out a number of useful actions within its framework. This work is complemented by the Network of National Coordinators, which was established under this Program.

    All stakeholders support the idea of reviving the Great Silk Road, preserving and enhancing the cultural heritage located on it. However, there are shortcomings in the coordination of these efforts, which hinders the achievement of this goal. To solve this problem, it is necessary to focus on educational work, on the development of cultures.
    Binqing Zhai
    Professor, Head, Department of Architecture and Director, Institute of Architecture, Xi 'an Jiaotong University
    Binqing Zhai, professor, head of the Department of Architecture, and director of the Institute of Architecture at Xi 'an Jiaotong University. He is the member of the Architectural Education Branch of Architectural Society of China, the member of Academic Degree Evaluation Committee of the School of Human Settlements and Environmental Science in Xi'an Jiaotong University. He has presided over dozens of research projects, and published 2 monographs and more than 40 academic papers. His research interests include the protection and renovation of historic areas, the renovation and revitalization of traditional villages, and the rehabilitation and reuse of industrial heritage sites.

    Paper: "Conservation of Han Chang'an Capital Heritage Site and the Impact to Local Indigenous Lives"

    Abstract: In recent years, heritage parks have been regarded as the best ways to give full play to the comprehensive values of the Great Heritage Sites in Chinese historic cities. While many people focus on exploring how to better exhibit the rich values of the heritage sites by means of heritage parks, what functions the indigenous lives and local stories can play in the conservation of heritage sites attracts little attention. Based on the case of Xi'an city, this paper examines the valuable elements among the local villagers as well as the potential hazards that heritage parks might bring to the heritage site.
    Andrey Filchenko
    Professor, Nazarbayev University
    Andrey Y. Filchenko is the Chair of Languages, Linguistics, and Literature at the School of Sciences and Humanities. He obtained the Candidate of Science in 2002 in Russia, the Master of Arts degree in 2004, and the Doctorate in Linguistics in 2007 at Rice University. Before coming to Nazarbayev University, Andrey was an associate professor, a senior research fellow, and a research department coordinator at a university in Russia; held research fellow and visiting professor positions in universities in the EU, Japan Hamburg and the US. His research is in Anthropological Linguistics, Field Methods & Language Documentation, Linguistic Typology, Cognitive Linguistics and focuses on evolution, areal contact, local variation, and change of languages/cultures of indigenous people of Northern Eurasia in the areal context of Eurasia.

    Paper: "Contemporary Practices of Language Documentation as Cultural Heritage
    Preservation"

    Abstract: Based on various estimates, between 50% and 80% of the world's linguistic diversity will disappear during the 21st century, meaning that out of estimated 6500 languages over 3500 will cease to be spoken in various parts of the world.
    While every language is to be recognized as a unique wealth of human knowledge accumulated over millennia, sadly, multiple languages in Central and Northern Eurasia are at risk. More often than not, these are languages and language varieties that are little studied and not well described, which exacerbates the problem even further.

    Methodologically and technologically rigorous modern documentation of linguistic diversity of this region is exactly establishing the connection of the intangible and the tangible.
    Recent and developing projects by NU LLL aim to address this problem. They offer an important empirical contribution to a number of debates pertaining to the history, evolution, variation, and change in the languages and cultures of the region. The experience of these projects is also useful in providing evidence in the discussion of the role of digital technologies in minority language/culture maintenance and revival, as well as in developing best practices for mitigating language endangerment.

    While these projects naturally focus on collecting primary language and culture data in relevant communities, their important component has also been digital archiving of legacy materials associated with a range of technical, methodological, and ethical issues.
    The presentation reviews three recent projects exemplifying key issues in language documentation and its impact on language endangerment and vitality.
    Gil Stein
    Director, Chicago Center for Cultural Heritage Preservation and Professor of
    Archaeology, Oriental Institute, University of Chicago
    Gil Stein is Director of the Chicago Center for Cultural Heritage Preservation and Professor of Archaeology at the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago. From 2002 to 2017 he served as Director of the Oriental Institute. He received his BA in Archaeology from Yale University and his PhD in Anthropology from the University of Pennsylvania. His research investigates ancient economies, the archaeology of colonialism, inter-regional interaction, the development of the earliest urbanized states in the Near East, zooarchaeology, and the preservation of cultural heritage. He has directed excavations at the Uruk period Mesopotamian trading colony of Hacınebi in Turkey (3700 BC), at the Ubaid period site of Tell Zeidan in Syria (ca 5300-3800 BC), and is currently excavating at the 6th-4th millennium BC town of Surezha in the Kurdistan region of Northeast Iraq. Since 2012 he has led the US State Department-funded partnership between the National Museum of Afghanistan in Kabul and the University of Chicago Oriental Institute. Partnership projects include museum outreach and education programs for high school students, training National Museum curators and conservators, restoring early Buddhist sculptures damaged by the Taliban, and conducting the first full inventory of the Museum's collections.

    Paper: "Preserving Cultural Heritage Along the Silk Road: University of Chicago Projects in Central Asia and Afghanistan"

    Abstract: The cultural heritage of the Silk Road countries in Central Asia and Afghanistan is at risk from four main factors: a) conflict, b) looting for the illicit antiquities market, c) population growth and urbanization, and d) rapid economic development. These risks vary from country to country, but together they are part of a global cultural heritage crisis of historically unprecedented proportions. The heritage crisis threatens the tangible heritage of objects, monuments, and sites, while also endangering the intangible heritage of traditional crafts, knowledge, music, art, literature, and languages. We need to remedy not only existing and ongoing heritage destruction, but we must also act pro-actively to preserve heritage-at-risk to preserve and protect it from future damage.

    This paper presents an overview of five remedial and pro-active projects that the University of Chicago is conducting to preserve cultural heritage in Afghanistan and the five Central Asian republics. In Afghanistan, the primary risks stem from the devastation of the country by conflict and looting for the illicit antiquities trade. By contrast, in the five Central Asian republics, our projects are pro-active initiatives to train heritage professionals and build capacity to protect heritage threatened by population growth, urbanization, and rapid economic development. One of the most effective ways to preserve endangered heritage in this region is to encourage shared standards, strategies and best practices through regional scale cooperation among the nations of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan.
    Jeffrey Altschul
    Founder, Statistical Research, Inc. and Co-President, Coalition for Archaeological Synthesis
    Jeffrey H. Altschul holds B.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Anthropology and has worked in cultural heritage management (CHM) since 1975. In 1983 he and his wife founded Statistical Research, Inc. (SRI) in the USA and in 2008, he co-founded Nexus Heritage in the United Kingdom. Together, the two consultancies provide CHM services around the world. In 2001, he founded the SRI Foundation which is a not-for-profit USA-based organization that advances historic preservation through education, research, and training. In 2017, Altschul established the Coalition for Archaeological Synthesis, and has served as its co-president since it was founded. He has been principal investigator on hundreds of CHM projects in North America, Latin America, Europe, Africa, and Asia. In 2010, he formed the Mongolian International Heritage Team (MIHT) which in 2010, designed the Oyu Tolgoi Cultural Heritage Program (CHP). In 2012, the MIHT performed a sample survey and predictive model for the Northern Railways project between Murun and Erdenet. In 2015, Altschul assisted the Mongolian Academy of Sciences with evaluating the heritage tourism aspects of the multinational (China-Mongolia-Russia) Tea Road as part of its consideration for potential World Heritage listing.

    Altschul has served as president of the Register of Professional Archaeologists and the Society for American Archaeology (SAA) and has been appointed to numerous boards of directors of professional societies. Altschul has written hundreds of technical reports and published papers, books, and monographs in cultural heritage. Of particular note are the Oyu Tolgoi Cultural Heritage Program: Protecting the Past, Preserving the Present: Report on Phase 1 Activities of the Oyu Tolgoi Cultural Heritage Program Design for Ömnögovi Aimag. (edited with B. Gunchinsuren and John W. Olsen) and The Oyu Tolgoi Cultural Heritage Program (edited with B. Gunchinsuren and John W. Olsen).

    Paper: "Building a Future without Losing the Past: The Challenge of Cultural Heritage Management"

    Abstract: Cultural Heritage Management (CHM) is based on the premise that countries can balance economic development with historic preservation. CHM frameworks generally fall into two categories. Countries where cultural heritage is viewed as national patrimony often make CHM the responsibility of the state, whereas those which cede authority to local communities commonly condition development on meeting project-specific heritage objectives, a process commonly referred to as obtaining a social license. Regardless of which approach is adopted, the keys to success are providing adequate resources to ensure protection mandates, empowering local and descendant communities, strong government regulation, and independent verification. I will discuss these points through a case study: the Oyu Tolgoi cultural heritage program for Ӧmnӧgovi aimag, Mongolia.
    Neil Collins
    Professor, Nazarbayev University
    Neil Collins is currently a Professor of political science at
    Nazarbayev University (NU), Kazakhstan. Dr Collins has held academic posts at the Universities of Liverpool, Birmingham and Ulster. Before moving to Kazakhstan, he was Professor and Head of the Department of Government and Politics at the University College Cork (UCC) in Ireland. Neil Collins has a PhD in political sciences from the Trinity College Dublin. His research interests include political marketing, regulation and governance, corruption, politics of China and the EU. Neil Collins is the official representative of NU in the European Consortium for Political Research, a member of the National Research Council of the Republic of Kazakhstan and NU IREC. The EU Horizon 2020 programme funded his most recent project which examined the role of cultural diplomacy in Central Asia.
    Aziz Burkhanov
    Associate Professor, Graduate School of Public Policy, Nazarbayev University
    Aziz Burkhanov is Associate Professor in the Graduate School of Public Policy at Nazarbayev University in Nur-Sultan, Republic of Kazakhstan. His research interests include nationalism and identity theories, and national identity politics, policies, and practices, with a special focus on identity issues and their perceptions in the public narratives in the former Soviet area. He has worked in policy analysis and consulting as a Research Fellow at the IWEP, a think-tank advising the Kazakhstan government on policies, and as a Senior Associate at IHS Cambridge Energy Research Associates (CERA). He has authored "Kazakhstan's National Identity-Building Policy: Soviet Legacy, State Efforts, and Societal Reactions," Cornell International Law Journal (2017), "The Determinants of Civic and Ethnic Nationalisms in Kazakhstan: Evidence from the Grass-Roots Level" Nationalism and Ethnic Politics (2017); and "Kazakh Perspective on China, the Chinese, and Chinese Migration," Ethnic and Racial Studies (2016); among others.
    Soumyen Bandyopadhyay
    Sir James Stirling Chair in Architecture, Liverpool School of Architecture
    Soumyen Bandyopadhyay is the Sir James Stirling Chair in Architecture at the Liverpool School of Architecture (LSA), having previously held professorial positions at the Manchester School of Architecture (MSA) and Nottingham Trent University. He directs the Centre for the Study of Architecture and Cultural Heritage of India, Arabia and the Maghreb (ArCHIAM), an interdisciplinary forum with research projects in Oman, Qatar, Morocco and India. Bandyopadhyay has extensive experience of architectural practice in India and the Middle East and has undertaken advisory and consultancy work in urban development, regeneration, architectural and urban design, and conservation. In addition to his published works in journals he is also the author of Site and Composition (Routledge, 2016) and Manah: Omani Oasis, Arabian Legacy (Liverpool University Press, 2011), and co-editor of The Territories of Identity (Routledge, 2013), Humanities in Architectural Design (Routledge 2010) and Thinking Practice (Black Dog 2007).
    Dmitriy Voyakin
    Director, International Institute for Central Asian Studies, Samarkand, Uzbekistan; International Facilitator, UNESCO Silk Road Serial Transnational Nomination
    Dmitriy Voyakin: Research Scientist (1997), Senior Research Scientist, Head of the department of Documentation and Archaeological Conservation at the lnstitute of Archaeology MES, Almaty, Kazakhstan (since 2005). M.A. (1999) from the Al-Faraby Kazakh State University (Honors), Ph.D. (2010) from the lnstitute of Archaeology MES RoK. General Director of the NGO "Archaeological Expertise" (since 2006). Director of the International Institute for Central Asian Studies (since 2018). Delegate to the World Heritage Committee from the Republic of Kazakhstan (2014-2017). Secretary-General of the National World Heritage Committee of the Republic of Kazakhstan (2014-2018). Member of the National Commission of the RoK for UNESCO and ISESCO (since 2018). Member of the National Scientific Council of the RoK. Field director of the more than ten archaeological expeditions (among them permanent archaeological missions at Otrar, Kayalyk, Akyrtas, Taraz, Sygnak, Dzhan kala, Dzhankent, Dzhuvara, Christian site Ilibalyk and Investigation of archaeological sites on the dry bottom of Aral sea), several international expeditions. Published 7 books, 7 albums, over 190 scientific papers, edited several monographs, 9 volumes of Heritage Sites of Zhambyl Region. One of the author and main executor of creation the "Kone Taraz" (Ancient Taraz) archaeological park project, "Almaty 1000 years' anniversary" and "Shymkent 2200 years' anniversary" inclusion to UNESCO calendar. Silk Road Serial Transnational Nomination UNESCO international facilitator.
    Peter F. Biehl
    Professor of Anthropology, American Council on Education (ACE) Fellow, University at Buffalo, State University of New York
    Peter F. Biehl is Professor of Anthropology at the University at Buffalo (UB), the State University of New York, and is currently a Fellow of the American Council on Education (ACE). He served as Department Chair as well as Associate Dean for Enrollment and International Education in the College of Arts and Sciences. He chaired the UB Provost's Task Force for Inclusion and Engagement of International Students, the Budget and Resources Committee of the General Education Program and the Campus-Wide Course Evaluations Committee. He also is the Director of the Institute for European and Mediterranean Archaeology (IEMA), the Marian E. White Anthropology Research Museum and the Critical Museum Studies MA Program (CMS) and the Chair of UB's Council on International Studies and Programs (CISP). At UB, he received the Distinguished Postdoc Mentor Award of the Graduate School and the SUNY Chancellor's Award for Internationalization. Internationally, he is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London and the German Archaeological Institute, and Chair of the Oscar Montelius Foundation of the European Association of Archaeologists (EAA). He received fellowships from the Research Center for Anatolian Civilizations, German Academic Exchange (DAAD), and the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. He has taught at universities in Halle, Freiburg, Cambridge and Paris, and directed excavations in Germany and Turkey. Research areas include climate change in the past and present, material culture, museums and heritage, with ten books and more than 120 articles, book chapters and exhibitions (https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7502-0343).
    Reed Coil
    Assistant Professor, Nazarbayev University
    Reed Coil is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Nazarbayev University. He holds a PhD in Anthropology from the University of Minnesota. His research interests include early human subsistence strategies and range expansion. Dr. Coil is a member of the international research team at the Paleolithic archaeological site of Dmanisi, Georgia, which is home to the earliest hominin fossils in Eurasia. His other active projects range from Neanderthal/Modern human space use and subsistence patterns in several cave sites of western Georgia, to surveys for Paleolithic hominin presence in East and South Kazakhstan, to faunal analyses of Bronze Age and Iron Age settlements and burials in Kazakhstan.
    Dr. Loretta O'Donnell
    Vice Provost for Academic Affairs at Nazarbayev University
    Dr. Loretta O'Donnell was appointed in 2013 as the Vice Provost for Academic Affairs at Nazarbayev University in Kazakhstan. She also served as Interim Provost in 2016.
    As the Vice Provost for Academic Affairs, Dr. O'Donnell coordinates with Deans to develop international quality academic systems for educational programs. She liaises with Nazarbayev University strategic partners, including Duke, National University of Singapore and University of Wisconsin-Madison to implement the academic mission of the University and to share NU experiences with local and regional universities.
    Dr. O'Donnell is the co-founder and co-chair of the NU/KAZGUU Annual International Academic Integrity Conference.

    She presents on Eurasian Higher Education themes at international conferences including ASEF (Asian European Foundation) Rectors' Conference; Eurasian Higher Education Leaders' Forum; Times Higher Education Asian Universities Summit, the University Alliance of the Silk Road and the NU Annual Gender Forum.

    Dr. O'Donnell is the Chair of the Nazarbayev University Learning and Teaching Committee, the University Library Committee and several other university-level committees.
    She has over twenty years of experience in teaching Executive MBA, postgraduate and undergraduate business students in the UNSW Business School, University of New South Wales (UNSW) located in Sydney, Australia.

    As an elected faculty member of the UNSW Academic Board, and as Associate Dean Education at the UNSW Business School, she combined academic policy development and implementation with her teaching, learning and research interests.

    She was Academic Director for the UNSW AGSM Graduate Certificate in Change Management and the Masters of Commerce program.
    Dr. O'Donnell has won awards for her teaching and for research on human capital analysis in financial markets.

    Previously, she consulted in organizational change for a large global consulting firm in Sydney and in Chicago, and in a boutique firm specializing in developing management systems to sustain change.
    Her academic qualifications include PhD in Management (Macquarie Graduate School of Management); MBA (AGSM, UNSW), Graduate Diploma in Education and Bachelor of Arts (Honours) (N'cle).
    Gani Nygymetov
    Deputy governor of North Kazakhstan region
    Gani Nygymetov is the deputy governor of North Kazakhstan region. Before accepting this post, he worked at the UNDP headquarters in New York, Nazarbayev University, Center for International Programs JSC, Center of Strategic Initiatives LLP, and Eurasian Integration Institute LLP. He also served as the head of the Inner Policy Department of the Presidential Administration of the Republic of Kazakhstan.
    Student Submissions
    Please watch these video presentations prior to the discussion on November 19.

    At this time, students will receive feedback from distinguished scholars during a panel discussion. Awards will be given for the top submissions.

    About the competition:
    We invited HANSR member universities to nominate students (from the undergraduate to doctoral level) to participate in a competition for the best student video presentation. We received the short research presentations (5 minutes maximum), below, in which students explain their research and its importance for the study and management of heritage resources in the Silk Road region.
    Contact us:
    For More Information about the Heritage Alliance for the New Silk Road or about the upcoming workshop, email: hansr@nu.edu.kz

    The Heritage Alliance of the New Silk Road is an independent consortium of scholars interested in studying, protecting, and sustainably managing the cultural resources of the broader Silk Road region. HANSR was formed from discussions and collaborations facilitated by the University Alliance for the Silk Road (UASR) and the groups work closely together.